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Centre for London welcomes former City Hall official as Chief Executive

Centre for London welcomes former City Hall official as Chief Executive

This week Nick Bowes, a former senior City Hall official, has joined Centre for London as Chief Executive. Founded in 2011, Centre for London is the capital’s dedicated think tank. Politically independent, the Centre undertakes research and puts forward new policy solutions to address the city’s challenges.

Nick joins Centre for London from the Greater London Authority, where he was the Mayoral Director of Policy. Between 2010 and 2015, Nick was the Special Adviser to Sadiq Khan as Shadow Secretary of State for Justice and Constitutional Reform. He previously worked at the Royal Society, EEF (now Make UK) and the CBI and is also a Visiting Senior Research Fellow at the Policy Institute, King’s College London, and a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society and the Royal Society of Arts.

Nick Bowes, Chief Executive of Centre for London said:

“The pandemic reinforced the urgent need to tackle many deep-seated issues – from inequality and insecurity, to low pay and unaffordable housing. And newer challenges confront the city: how to fund and support the city’s transport network; how to clean London’s air and decarbonise; the precautions we need to take to prevent further epidemics and the national ‘levelling up’ agenda.

“If ever London has needed a think tank, then it is now.

“I am proud to be joining Centre for London at this critical time. We will put the Centre at the heart of the debate about London’s future, test out new ideas and give politicians and public sector officials space to think.

“I look forward to working with London’s political leaders and decision makers to build the city’s resilience and aid its recovery.”

Spokesperson

Nick is available for broadcast interviews and to provide comment across the full range of policy areas including transport, housing, planning, economy and culture. Nick is particularly interested in London’s recovery and how London fits in with the government’s levelling up agenda.

ENDS